PRESERVES

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The Goodsell Ridge Preserve and the Fisk Quarry Preserve are important sites of the Chazy Fossil Reef,  protected for education, research, and public appreciation.  They are owned by The Isle La Motte Preservation Trust with conservation easements co-held by the Lake Champlain Land Trust and the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board.  In 2009 these and several other sites received the designation of National Natural Landmark from the US Department of the Interior and the Department of Parks and Recreation.
Visitors  are asked to respect the rules of these protected sites which include no removal of plants, animals, or rocks from either of the preserves. Fossil collecting or damage to the rocks is strictly forbidden.  These are places for quiet walking, observation and learning, but not for vehicular traffic, bicycles, or other activities which may damage the fragile ecosystem and geological formations of the preserves.

The Goodsell Ridge Preserve
is an 83 acre Outdoor Museum

239 Quarry Rd / Isle La Motte, VT 05463

In all seasons of the year visitors can park in the designated area on Quarry Road and explore our:

*Nature trails which wend their way through every ecosystem of the preserve.  

*An Outdoor Kiosk which tells the story of the ancient Chazy Fossil Reef in English and French

Kiosk at the Goodsell Ridge Preserve
Kiosk at the Goodsell Ridge Preserve

From Memorial Day Weekend to Columbus Day Weekend visitors can explore our:

*Discovery Areas
where interpretive signage identifies representative fossils etched in the reef rocks

 Walk Through Time Trail
is a world class outdoor exhibit on which some 80 colorfully illustrated panels  are set up along a 4,600 foot trail. They depict the scientific understanding of  the 4.6 billion year history of life on Earth.

Museum and Learning Center
is currently housed in a restored farmhouse on site.
Here exhibits and a video tell the story of the Chazy Fossil Reef
and its ancient marine inhabitants.

Finding Fossils in the Rock
Finding Fossils in the Rock
Earth was born 4.6 billion years ago
Earth was born 4.6 billion years ago
Our Museum & Education Center  is in this  restored Farmhouse.
Our Museum & Education Center is in this restored Farmhouse.
Fossil Gastropod
Fossil Gastropod
Family Walks Through Time
Family Walks Through Time
Learning Wondrous Things
Learning Wondrous Things

Now our Museum / Education Center 

is about to move into a new home, our recently renovated Dairy Barn

Our New Museum/Education Center
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We look forward to seeing you here in 2017.

The Fisk Quarry Preserve
is a 20 Acre Preserve
West Shore Road just south of Fisk Farm

The Fisk Quarry was the first acquisition of the Isle La Motte Preservation Trust which took place in 1998 in partnership with the Preservation Trust of Vermont and has been a favorite destination for geologists for many years.  The rock is composed of the Chazy Fossil Reef, which is the bedrock of the entire southern third of Isle La Motte.  It is limestone, which, when polished, resembles marble.

 The limestone (marketed as marble) was mined in six quarries on the island during the 19th and 20th centuries. The Fisk Quarry was the oldest of these, first mined by the French  in 1666 to make lime mortar for the construction of Fort St. Anne. Active throughout the 19th Century up until about 1919, it was then abandoned as it was no longer profitable.  

In 1998 the old abandoned quarry was purchased by the Isle La Motte Preservation Trust and is now a preserve.   Fossils from the reef in ancient seas almost half a billion years ago can be seen in the walls and the floor of the quarry.

In all seasons visitors can

park in the designated area along West Shore Road (south of Fisk Farm) and walk into the quarry.  Fossil remnants can be seen in the quarry floor, sometimes encircled in stones placed by previous visitors.  

 walk 600 feet along the road to the north to a pedestrian path.  At the end of the path is a kiosk telling the geological, human, and ecological history of the quarry.  There is also a dramatic view of the Quarry pond and the fossil remains of stromatoporoids in the quarry walls.

As in the Goodsell Ridge Preserve, please help to protect the fossils as well as other rock formations, plants, and wild life.

 

The Fisk Quarry Preserve Entrance
The Fisk Quarry Preserve Entrance
Fossil Stromatopoids in the quarry walls
Fossil Stromatopoids in the quarry walls
The Fisk Quarry Preserve
The Fisk Quarry Preserve
Fossil in the Quarry Floor
Fossil in the Quarry Floor

The Fisk Quarry As Habitat

Since quarrying ceased in the early twentieth century   ground and surface water formed a system of wetlands on the Fisk Quarry Preserve with ponds and marshes in the old quarry excavation and adjacent wet meadow and woodland areas.  Wetlands, like ancient and modern reefs, support an abundance of biological diversity and the Fisk Quarry Preserve is no exception.

“For a number of species, from plants to amphibians to birds and mammals, the cove-like aspect of the quarry provides shelter from the harsh wind and weather of the open lake.  In the several days that I was there I was able to do some naturalizing, looking at birds and wildlife, and even made a preliminary list of the birds I observed. The few observations I undertook convinced me that the potential for significant habitats is worth investigating.  The fact that there are  Great Blue and  Green-backed Herons as well as raptors and mink feeding in the quarry suggests to me that the quarry may also house healthy populations of prey groups such as amphibians and small mammals as well as aquatic insects.”

Dan Froelich, Naturalist

The Fisk Quarry Preserve
is a 20 Acre Preserve
West Shore Road just south of Fisk Farm

The Fisk Quarry was the first acquisition of the Isle La Motte Preservation Trust which took place in 1998 in partnership with the Preservation Trust of Vermont and has been a favorite destination for geologists for many years.  The rock is composed of the Chazy Fossil Reef, which is the bedrock of the entire southern third of Isle La Motte.  It is limestone, which, when polished, resembles marble.

 The limestone (marketed as marble) was mined in six quarries on the island during the 19th and 20th centuries. The Fisk Quarry was the oldest of these, first mined by the French  in 1666 to make lime mortar for the construction of Fort St. Anne. Active throughout the 19th Century up until about 1919, it was then abandoned as it was no longer profitable.  

In 1998 the old abandoned quarry was purchased by the Isle La Motte Preservation Trust and is now a preserve.   Fossils from the reef in ancient seas almost half a billion years ago can be seen in the walls and the floor of the quarry.

In all seasons visitors can

park in the designated area along West Shore Road (south of Fisk Farm) and walk into the quarry.  Fossil remnants can be seen in the quarry floor, sometimes encircled in stones placed by previous visitors.  

 walk 600 feet along the road to the north to a pedestrian path.  At the end of the path is a kiosk telling the geological, human, and ecological history of the quarry.  There is also a dramatic view of the Quarry pond and the fossil remains of stromatoporoids in the quarry walls.

As in the Goodsell Ridge Preserve, please help to protect the fossils as well as other rock formations, plants, and wild life.

 

The Fisk Quarry Preserve Entrance
The Fisk Quarry Preserve Entrance
Fossil Stromatopoids in the quarry walls
Fossil Stromatopoids in the quarry walls
The Fisk Quarry Preserve
The Fisk Quarry Preserve
Fossil in the Quarry Floor
Fossil in the Quarry Floor

The Fisk Quarry As Habitat

Since quarrying ceased in the early twentieth century   ground and surface water formed a system of wetlands on the Fisk Quarry Preserve with ponds and marshes in the old quarry excavation and adjacent wet meadow and woodland areas.  Wetlands, like ancient and modern reefs, support an abundance of biological diversity and the Fisk Quarry Preserve is no exception.

“For a number of species, from plants to amphibians to birds and mammals, the cove-like aspect of the quarry provides shelter from the harsh wind and weather of the open lake.  In the several days that I was there I was able to do some naturalizing, looking at birds and wildlife, and even made a preliminary list of the birds I observed. The few observations I undertook convinced me that the potential for significant habitats is worth investigating.  The fact that there are  Great Blue and  Green-backed Herons as well as raptors and mink feeding in the quarry suggests to me that the quarry may also house healthy populations of prey groups such as amphibians and small mammals as well as aquatic insects.”

Dan Froelich, Naturalist

Beaver, muskrat, fish, turtles, salamanders, and a symphony of frogs have made homes in the old quarry.
Beaver, muskrat, fish, turtles, salamanders, and a symphony of frogs have made homes in the old quarry.
Turtle Pond has an almost constant cover of duckweed.
Turtle Pond has an almost constant cover of duckweed.

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